Experiences From the Field: Finding and Losing Yourself in Haiti Mentors and teachers see attributes and skills in persons who often do not recognize those attributes and skills in themselves. In 1977, I completed my graduate work at Texas State University and began my Clinical Fellowship at Brenham State School in Brenham, Texas. My wife and I became close ... Article
Article  |   September 01, 2011
Experiences From the Field: Finding and Losing Yourself in Haiti
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Gilbert C. Hanke
    General Commission on United Methodist Men, Nashville, TN
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / School-Based Settings / International & Global / Articles
Article   |   September 01, 2011
Experiences From the Field: Finding and Losing Yourself in Haiti
SIG 17 Perspectives on Global Issues in Communication Sciences and Related Disorders, September 2011, Vol. 1, 72-75. doi:10.1044/gics1.2.72
SIG 17 Perspectives on Global Issues in Communication Sciences and Related Disorders, September 2011, Vol. 1, 72-75. doi:10.1044/gics1.2.72
Mentors and teachers see attributes and skills in persons who often do not recognize those attributes and skills in themselves. In 1977, I completed my graduate work at Texas State University and began my Clinical Fellowship at Brenham State School in Brenham, Texas. My wife and I became close friends with our pastor, Rev. Sam Duree, and his wife. Rev. Duree suggested that I go on a mission trip. I believed that I had no skills that could be used in “some third world country.” Sam was unrelenting, and I was stubborn and insistent. We moved to Nacogdoches, Texas, where we became active in another United Methodist Church and were asked to represent the church at the Annual Conference meetings. Upon arrival, we connected with Sam and found that he had a new position within the church as the new mission secretary. This gave him additional information and, eventually, I reluctantly agreed to go on a mission trip. With my permission, he selected the place: Haiti. This made a seemingly senseless decision seem even more ridiculous. My concerns were that the poverty would break my heart; that I would be around children (which I like) with whom I could not communicate (which would frustrate me); and that this week would be a waste of time (because I believed I did not have the skills). The poverty did break my heart, but my other assumptions were not correct.
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