Speech-Language Pathology in the Peace Corps: Necessity and Sustainability In countries other than the United States, the study and practice of speech-language pathology is little known or nonexistent. Recognition of professionals in the field is minimal. Speech-language pathologists in countries where speech-language pathology is a widely recognized and respected profession often seek to share their expertise in places where ... Article
Article  |   May 01, 2012
Speech-Language Pathology in the Peace Corps: Necessity and Sustainability
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Melissa A. Pierce
    United States Peace CorpsSechura, Piura, Perú
  • Author's Note: The author of this paper did not receive any royalties or other forms of remuneration from the Peace Corps. The views expressed herein are those of the author alone and do not represent those of the Peace Corps or United States Government.
    Author's Note: The author of this paper did not receive any royalties or other forms of remuneration from the Peace Corps. The views expressed herein are those of the author alone and do not represent those of the Peace Corps or United States Government.×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / School-Based Settings / Regulatory, Legislative & Advocacy / International & Global / Articles
Article   |   May 01, 2012
Speech-Language Pathology in the Peace Corps: Necessity and Sustainability
SIG 17 Perspectives on Global Issues in Communication Sciences and Related Disorders, May 2012, Vol. 2, 11-18. doi:10.1044/gics2.1.11
SIG 17 Perspectives on Global Issues in Communication Sciences and Related Disorders, May 2012, Vol. 2, 11-18. doi:10.1044/gics2.1.11

In countries other than the United States, the study and practice of speech-language pathology is little known or nonexistent. Recognition of professionals in the field is minimal. Speech-language pathologists in countries where speech-language pathology is a widely recognized and respected profession often seek to share their expertise in places where little support is available for individuals with communication disorders. The Peace Corps offers a unique, long-term volunteer opportunity to people with a variety of backgrounds, including speech-language pathologists. Though Peace Corps programs do not specifically focus on speech-language pathology, many are easily adapted to the profession because they support populations of people with disabilities. This article describes how the needs of local children with communication disorders are readily addressed by a Special Education Peace Corps volunteer.

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