Coordinator's Column Special Interest Group 17, Global Issues in Communication Sciences and Related Disorders, plays an important role in drawing attention to the need for authentic international collaborations. It is critical that work with our international colleagues be mutually beneficial. An article on ethics in this issue of Perspectives directs us ... Coordinator's Column
Coordinator's Column  |   September 01, 2012
Coordinator's Column
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International & Global / Coordinator's Column
Coordinator's Column   |   September 01, 2012
Coordinator's Column
SIG 17 Perspectives on Global Issues in Communication Sciences and Related Disorders, September 2012, Vol. 2, 39. doi:10.1044/gics2.2.39
SIG 17 Perspectives on Global Issues in Communication Sciences and Related Disorders, September 2012, Vol. 2, 39. doi:10.1044/gics2.2.39
Special Interest Group 17, Global Issues in Communication Sciences and Related Disorders, plays an important role in drawing attention to the need for authentic international collaborations. It is critical that work with our international colleagues be mutually beneficial. An article on ethics in this issue of Perspectives directs us to think seriously about our motives in our international collaborations. Many of us have volunteered our services in other countries on a short-term basis. We are asked to question whether we make these “visits” from a neo-colonialist attitude, whereby we are going to other countries to “fix” them. Or are we making sustainable contributions? One group of graduate students and faculty members from The Ohio State University describe how they were able to support literacy development in the Solyluna School in Merida, Mexico. Their motivations are clear: to meet the needs of patients and families. They provided culturally appropriate information and a means to sustain book reading in this school and community. An in-country experience that included faculty and students from Texas State University with patients and families from Monterrey, Mexico, describes how they met mutual goals for evaluation and treatment. Rather than going abroad, families and their children came to the United States for these services. University partners in Michigan and in West Africa developed a rigorous study abroad program, which the authors describe. It provides, among its five goals, a means of disseminating knowledge of the consequences of globalization. Finally, an article on the review of ASHA Journals over the last ten years and their inclusion of international research participants lets us know that our research includes our global partners in increasing numbers—a goal of our ever-expanding international efforts.
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