Observations of Nicaraguan Preschools Purpose: Preschool education is important for young children and provides the necessary basic skills to build literacy in later school years. Nicaragua does not require preschool education for children. The purpose of this paper is to describe 3 classrooms in 2 rural private schools in Nicaragua. The present status of ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2013
Observations of Nicaraguan Preschools
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Hortencia Kayser
    Fellow of ASHA, Springfield, MO
  • Financial Disclosure: Hortencia Kayser is a retired professor and volunteers with Project H.O.P.E in Nicaragua.
    Financial Disclosure: Hortencia Kayser is a retired professor and volunteers with Project H.O.P.E in Nicaragua.×
    Nonfinancial Disclosure: Hortencia Kayser has previously published in this subject area.
    Nonfinancial Disclosure: Hortencia Kayser has previously published in this subject area.×
Article Information
School-Based Settings / International & Global / Articles
Article   |   October 01, 2013
Observations of Nicaraguan Preschools
SIG 17 Perspectives on Global Issues in Communication Sciences and Related Disorders, October 2013, Vol. 3, 62-67. doi:10.1044/gics3.2.62
SIG 17 Perspectives on Global Issues in Communication Sciences and Related Disorders, October 2013, Vol. 3, 62-67. doi:10.1044/gics3.2.62

Purpose: Preschool education is important for young children and provides the necessary basic skills to build literacy in later school years. Nicaragua does not require preschool education for children. The purpose of this paper is to describe 3 classrooms in 2 rural private schools in Nicaragua. The present status of preschool education, teachers, and curricula for 2 schools will be described and a recommendation is provided to speech-language pathologists who would like to collaborate with teachers in Latin America.

Method: Conversations with 4 preschool directors, 3 teachers, and observations of 3 preschools classrooms at 2 private schools were collected over 2 years during 5 visits to Nicaragua.

Results: Nicaragua is a developing nation in Central America where education for children does not include preschools to prepare them for 1st grade. There were 2 preschools with affiliations with Americans had different curricula, organization, activities, materials and teacher interactions with children.

Conclusion: Preschool education in Nicaragua is developing but limited by the lack of support from the government. The education of teachers and administrators concerning the education of young children would benefit children's academic success in the upper grades and the development of this country. Professionals visiting Latin American countries to assist teachers and children must develop trust with these professionals before change will be observed.

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