Healthcare and Education in the Republic of Cuba Cuba has had many challenges to healthcare and education, particularly for its urban poor and rural citizens. The healthcare and education programs were restructured following the Cuban revolution led by Fidel Castro in 1959. The United States imposed an embargo on the country and ceased diplomatic relations in 1961. With ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2015
Healthcare and Education in the Republic of Cuba
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Dolores E. Battle
    Department of Speech-Language Pathology, SUNY Buffalo State, Orchard Park, NY
  • Financial Disclosure: Dolores E. Battle is Professor Emeritus in speech-language pathology at SUNY Buffalo State.
    Financial Disclosure: Dolores E. Battle is Professor Emeritus in speech-language pathology at SUNY Buffalo State.×
  • Nonfinancial Disclosure: Dolores E. Battle has no nonfinancial interests related to the content of this article.
    Nonfinancial Disclosure: Dolores E. Battle has no nonfinancial interests related to the content of this article.×
Article Information
International & Global / Articles
Article   |   October 01, 2015
Healthcare and Education in the Republic of Cuba
SIG 17 Perspectives on Global Issues in Communication Sciences and Related Disorders, October 2015, Vol. 5, 75-81. doi:10.1044/gics5.2.75
History: Received August 17, 2015 , Revised October 3, 2015 , Accepted October 15, 2015
SIG 17 Perspectives on Global Issues in Communication Sciences and Related Disorders, October 2015, Vol. 5, 75-81. doi:10.1044/gics5.2.75
History: Received August 17, 2015; Revised October 3, 2015; Accepted October 15, 2015

Cuba has had many challenges to healthcare and education, particularly for its urban poor and rural citizens. The healthcare and education programs were restructured following the Cuban revolution led by Fidel Castro in 1959. The United States imposed an embargo on the country and ceased diplomatic relations in 1961. With the support of the Soviet Union, Cuba established programs that provide free healthcare and free education to all from preschool through university. The literacy rate in Cuba exceeds 99%. Its programs in health diplomacy and literacy promotion have worldwide recognition. With the end of the Cold War, Cuba was able to continue its programs of healthcare and education without Soviet support. In July 2015 a group of speech-language pathologists (SLPs) and hearing specialists visited Cuba to gain an understanding of the Cuban health diplomacy and education systems for persons with communication disorders. This article will look at healthcare services, health diplomacy, services for the deaf, and education in Cuba. With brief review of Cuba pre-and post-revolution it will present a review of Cuba healthcare and education today and a look at the future as the United States moves toward normalization of relations with Cuba.

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